• USDA Still Plagued By Civil Rights Problems After Shirley Sherrod

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    WASHINGTON — Despite acknowledging a legacy of discrimination, the Department of Agriculture is still plagued by civil rights problems that have in the past led to unequal treatment of minorities seeking loans and other help, according to a government-commissioned report Wednesday.

    Most of the employees interviewed by a private consulting firm did not believe the department, sued over the years by blacks, Hispanic, American Indians and women, had a civil rights problem. Research by the Jackson Lewis LLP Corporate Diversity Counseling Group “substantiated in part the anecdotal claims of neglect, at best, and wide-spread discrimination, at worst” at the department.

    Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack arranged for the $8 million review as part of an effort to address long-running problems, many involving minorities denied loans by department field offices staffed mostly by white men.

    Discrimination was most acute at the agency responsible for delivering farm loans and other programs to rural residents. The study noted that far fewer minorities participated in many programs than did whites, and found not enough effort to go into minority communities to market loans and services.

    “Customers and potential customers stated that USDA policies and practices, often unintentionally, and sometimes purposely by ‘bad actors,’ result in the unfair treatment and denial of program access which have had a broad and longstanding negative impact,” the report said.

    Vilsack said the department has put in place some of the more than 200 recommendations from the report. Since he took over in 2009, he has focused on correcting civil rights problems, reviewing long-neglected complaints and settling lawsuits brought by the minority farmers. He calls it a “cultural transformation.”

    He ordered the report before the brouhaha involving a rural development administrator who was shown in an edited online video making what appeared to be racist remarks. Shirley Sherrod, who is black, was forced to resign, then quickly offered a new job in the civil rights department when it became clear that her comments were misunderstood. She has sued the conservative blogger who posted the video that led to her dismissal.

    Vilsack said he learned from the study that the rural field offices must do more to connect with minorities who may be reluctant to ask for loans because of the department’s history of discrimination. While those people who apply for loans in the offices may be treated fairly, he said, many don’t apply.

    “Because of the past, folks aren’t anxious to go into the office,” he said. “They think they are going to be turned away … We have to break that barrier, make people feel more comfortable.”

    Vilsack said he has stayed in touch with Sherrod and their discussions have given him new ideas on how to ease the civil rights strains.

    “We’re seeing progress because of that incident,” he said.

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