I’m Not Your SuperWoman By Terri M. Williams

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Black people expect to be in pain every day, so for us, a good day is heaven. But the truth is: everybody on the planet is walking around with unresolved wounds and scars. We’re all challenged on some level. Do you think you know a person who doesn’t have a problem? Think again!

terri-williams

from Essence.com

More people than ever are under a tremendous amount of stress; not just those who have been trapped in economically depressed/poor areas. Still, the problems are worse in poor communities — that’s why there is a critical need for more mental health awareness, better education and job opportunities.

If you’re really trying to identify depression in Black women, one of the first things to look for is a woman who is working very hard and seems disconnected from her own needs. She may be busy around the clock, constantly on the go, unable to relax, and often not getting her sleep so she can handle household, child care and job tasks. Not taking the time to tend to herself makes her more vulnerable to depression. Or her busyness may be a way to keep her mind off the feelings of sadness that have already arisen.

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Terrie M. Williams speaks about her new book entitled “Black Pain”

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